Hudson River Museum Hosts 'Art Of Video Games' History Exhibit

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The Hudson River Museum is featuring "The Art of Video Games" through Sunday, May 19. Photo Credit: Danny LoPriore
Parents brought the next generation of video game players to the Hudson River Museum's "The Art of Video Games" in Yonkers.
Parents brought the next generation of video game players to the Hudson River Museum's "The Art of Video Games" in Yonkers. Photo Credit: Danny LoPriore
Guides walked visitors through video game history at the Hudson River Museum's "The Art of Video Games" exhibit in Yonkers.
Guides walked visitors through video game history at the Hudson River Museum's "The Art of Video Games" exhibit in Yonkers. Photo Credit: Danny LoPriore
Greeters at the Hudson River Museum's "The Art of Video Games" and other exhibits in Yonkers.
Greeters at the Hudson River Museum's "The Art of Video Games" and other exhibits in Yonkers. Photo Credit: Danny LoPriore
Visitors to the Hudson River Museum's "The Art of Video Games" in Yonkers were televised live.
Visitors to the Hudson River Museum's "The Art of Video Games" in Yonkers were televised live. Photo Credit: Danny LoPriore

WESTCHESTER COUNTY, N.Y. -- Video game fanatics, techies and even history buffs have one more opportunity to travel through the amazing "Art of Video Games" exhibit at the Hudson River Museum in Yonkers which runs through Sunday, May 18.

The darkened lower exhibit rooms of the Hudson River Museum are alive with working models that capture the technological phenomenon of the last three decades from 1972's simple Pong to Donkey Kong to today's life-like, high-definition games.

"We have had people of all ages -- some who are experts at gaming and some older people who have never played one -- coming," said exhibit guide Bridget Kusi-Gyabaah, a Gorton High School (Yonkers) senior. "Our generation grew up on computers and games. The really young kids are getting to see where the games began."

The remarkable exhibit boasts the interplay of graphics, technology, music and storytelling for 20 gaming systems from Atari to PlayStation 4.

"I remember the first Pong and how amazing we thought it was," said Beth Westrate, a Dobbs Ferry mom who brought her two young daughters to the exhibit. "Our children pick up the technology so quickly and have so much more ability because it's part of their first learning. I thought it would fun to see how far we've come."

The exhibit is fully interactive with dozens of children of all ages tuning in to the wall displayed games.

"It's really very interesting to see how the games have progressed because I was 50 when they first came out and my children never played them," 78-year Ronald Dilfer of Ossining said. "I have tried to play some on my home computer. If we had these in the 1940s when I was a kid, I would have been a fanatic."

"The Art of the Video Games" has its last showing Sunday, May 18 from noon to 5 p.m.

Admission to the museum in $6 for adults, $4 for students with IDs and seniors over 62, and $3 for youngster from 3-18.

For more information on the Hudson River Museum and its exhibits, log on to the HRM website.

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