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First Responders Share Memories of Sept. 11

MAMARONECK, N.Y. -- Greg Sullivan fought back tears when mentioning his late brother Patrick at the League of Womens Voters monthly breakfast, where he shared his first-hand memories of the Sept. 11 attacks.

Sullivan, a former New York City sergeant, was one of three first responders from Mamaroneck and Larchmont who spoke at Friday morning's meeting at Hector's Village Cafe.

The retired policeman's brother Patrick worked in the World Trade Center, along with their younger brother Jerry, who left for another job just days before the attack. On Sept. 11, Patrick was in the building and couldn't be reached on his cell phone after the planes hit. Sullivan, who was stationed in Brooklyn, called and left instructions on his voice mail of where to go and what to do, but they were never returned. Patrick's body was never found and, 10 years later, Sullivan said his family is still looking for closure.

"That was really powerful," said Legislator Judy Myers, who represents Mamaroneck, Larchmont and Rye.

Larchmont Fire Department Captain John Caparelli's cousin Joseph Masceli was also missing for about seven months after the attack.

"On May 11, my birthday, they found Joey and they buried him next to his father, uncle, grandparents and great-grandparents," Caparelli said.

Masceli was also a first responder working on the site of the World Trade Center before the buildings collapsed. Caparelli later found his cousin's fire hat by the Rescue 5 engine that his Staten Island department arrived in. Caparelli surmised that he was standing outside the building when it collapsed.

Sullivan noted that 1,122 people at the World Trade Center were never found. "It sticks in my head because there's no closure there," he said.

Michael Cindrich, a lieutenent with the Town of Mamaroneck, played a periphery role doing security detail around the United Nations. He, too, knew people who died, including his son's friend's father, who he said never got the chance to see his son become a doctor.

"We each have our own memory of that day and each memory is unique and personal," said Carolyn Pomeranz, vice president of Mamaroneck Library Board of Directors.

What are your memories of 9/11? Do you know someone who was directly effected by the attacks? Comment below, on Facebook or Twitter. You can also submit your response to local reporter Brian Donnelly at bdonnelly@mainstreetconnect.us.