New York State Police Ticket More Than 22K During 'Speed Week' Detail

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New York State Police issued more than 22,000 tickets during Speed Week this year.
New York State Police issued more than 22,000 tickets during Speed Week this year. Photo Credit: NYSPnews.com

WESTCHESTER COUNTY, N.Y. – The New York State Police says it issued more than 22,000 tickets during its state-wide Speed Week campaign from Aug. 6 to Aug. 12.

During the campaign, a trooper stopped a man on a motorcycle for speeding through Interstate 87 in the town of Athens, according to police. Roddy Yagan, 23, of Liverpool, was driving 129 mph in a 65 mph zone. He was ticketed and charged with reckless driving, a misdemeanor.

Police also were on the lookout for distracted or impaired drivers, motorists not buckled up properly, and people violating the “Move Over Law.”

A total of 10,266 tickets were issued for speeding; 279 tickets were issued for texting while driving; 577 tickets were issued for cell phone use while driving; 238 tickets were issued for driving while intoxicated; and 622 tickets were issued for violating the Move Over Law, according New York State Police.

Police say the purpose of holding Speed Week is “to reduce speed-related crashes and improve safe travel for drivers and passengers on New York’s roads.”
 

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how about they worry about real crime instead of people driving fast.

how about they worry about real crime instead of people driving fast.

This events are not done every day so the impact is short lived. Police can give a million tickets but it is not solving the problem. They give tons of tickets in White Plains for parking and still people don't pay or park over the time limits. They give out tickets to cars but speeding and not stopping for pedestrians is so common that all those tickets are money making but do not solve the problem. Mamaroneck Ave needs more parking and should cut out much of the large sidewalks that are not maintained well and put in side by side parking and make the street one lane in each direction. This might slow the racing down the street. City workers including garbage collectors and even the police need to go slower and not turn when it is "no turn on red." Speeding on the highways is never going to be stopped unless there is a daily monitoring and maybe post people's pictures on line. People don't like getting their pictures taken when they are breaking the law. Shame and peer pressure might work. When smoking was banned indoors at movies or in airplanes there were often people who violated the rules. Enforcement and people speaking up is what stopped it.

I wish they would come to the toll booths on the Thruway in Yonkers and catch the speeders there - the Japanese bikes that come through there wake me up all the time!